Videogames and Healthcare

Videogames are becoming an integral part of education, work and health. Companies are designing new ways to keep their employees motivated, and are providing similar options to students. Furthermore, non-adherence in healthcare is being targeted as an area that videogames, or gamification is particular, can improve upon.

A recent article from imedicalapps.com discusses LiteSprite, a company that developed an anti-anxiety application called SinaSprite. LiteSprite was the winner of the Games to Generate Data Challenge competition by Games for Health. The article covers an interview with Swatee Surve, the CEO and David Hazel, Technical Advisor.

Hopefully, the days of bland patient information and mind-numbingly dull educational videos will soon be behind us. Increasingly, people are recognizing games as a way to better engage patients for educational and therapeutic purposes. These include mainstream consumer titles like the Wii Fit to specialized applications like laparoscopic surgical simulations and physical rehabilitation. In the past decade, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation — a philanthropy whose aim is to improve healthcare — has provided grants and guidance for Games for Health and related initiatives. Their most recent competition, the Games To Generate Data Challenge, targets population health.

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USA Today: “Technology, prevention will move healthcare costs down”

Medication non-adherence is estimated to cost the U.S anywhere between $180 to $400billion dollars annually. Many in the industry view technology as the solution to increasing adherence in patients and cutting healthcare costs. USA Today recently wrote an article on the subject and how the Affordable Care Act could prevent unnecessary costs in the industry. These include penalties for patient readmission with preventative illnesses and the increased use of healthcare information technology in administrative processes.

“WASHINGTON — In 2014, expect a flurry of changes to continue to bend the health cost curve down, accelerated by the Affordable Care Act, experts say.

Even die-hard believers in the connection between the economy and how people spend on medical expenses are saying this may be the year that proves them wrong, as providers and insurers rush to make changes to keep profit margins high in light of changes in how they’re billed. They’ll be led by improved technology that helps them see how to improve quality; preventive programs that have proven they can save millions in long-term costs; and an acknowledgement that consumers hold the purse strings.

“There is a considerable level of consensus based on several recent studies about how to keep costs down,” said David Blumenthal, president of The Commonwealth Fund, whose report looking at recent research was released Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. “I think there’s a lot of work to be done.”

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Children’s Medical Center and a New Asthma Initiative

A blog on the Dallas section of BizJournals recently covered a new collaboration between Children’s Medical Center and a non-profit research and development firm called PCCI.

The collaboration includes two major projects which aim to develop predictive modeling and networking technologies to alleviate health concerns in children. The first project deals specifically with chronic asthma. One of the most difficult factor to assess in healthcare is risk. Thus, striving to better understand risk factors in children with chronic asthma could significantly reduce future health problems.

Children’s Medical Center is partnering with nonprofit research and development firm PCCI on two new projects that use predictive modeling and networking technologies to keep children healthier.

The first project focuses on helping children with chronic asthma, which is the third-leading cause of pediatric hospital re-admissions nationally and a significant cause of admissions and re-admissions at Children’s Medical Center.

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Breakfast at Glenfield – The Educational Music Video about ACUTE ASTHMA MANAGEMENT

Asthma Treatment Guidelines are essential to successfully treating asthma attacks, yet, at a British hospital, less than half of the doctors and staff utilized them. A third of them weren’t aware that they existed. One of the doctors on staff decided to create an informative music video for the staff.

A survey, taken two months after the video, showed a significant increase in guideline usage (<50% to around 80%) in doctors and staff.

Read the article about the video here.

Watch the video.

Geckocap is a better method to manage your child’s asthma medication. Find out more here